Homeowner Solar Power

Homeowner Solar Power


Find out if your local energy provider offers meter rollback programs. Once you have a solar energy system, you should consider joining one of these programs so you can sell the energy you produce to the main grid and draw the same amount of energy instead of purchasing an expensive battery system to store your power.

Once your panels are in place, keep an eye on them and monitor them regularly. Get to know what you daily output of energy is, what everything looks like when operating optimally and even keep a record of such things. This can help you quickly notice when something isn't working correctly and help you ascertain where the problem is.

Carefully consider the types of solar panels you plan on having installed. Long ago, if you didn't have enough roof space, you'd need very expensive high efficiency mono-crystalline panels. There are now more advanced polycrystalline panels and even thin film panels. If you've got enough roof space, you might wish to look at the size of the panels in relation to their output capacity to avoid having insufficient panels that you need more of later.


In Hawaii, where 12 percent of the homes have solar panels, handling the surplus power is putting pressure on the state’s biggest utility, which is fighting to …

You should consider switching to solar power if your home receives 5 hours of sun per day and you experience high energy rates. In this case, your investment in purchase and installation will be well worth it.

To help keep your solar energy panels running efficiently, keep a record of your solar panels performance. On this record, note when the days are overcast and how much energy your panels produced. This will help you plan your energy consumption better. For example, if the forecast is cloudy, then you should wait to do household chores that use a lot of energy.

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